nullEvery organization wants to give their employees a positive experience. They invest heavily on employee branding, wellness programs, and free on-site facilities designed to increase engagement and decrease attrition.

Betsey Strobl, Talent and Organization Effectiveness Leader for Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa, explores creating organizational effectiveness and a culture where employees excel.

Every organization wants to give their employees a positive experience. They invest heavily on employee branding, wellness programs, and free on-site facilities designed to increase engagement and decrease attrition.

But how do you create a company culture that drives the behaviours you want? The kind of behaviours that lead to success?

Betsey Strobl, Talent and Organization Effectiveness Leader for Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa at Mondelēz says it’s about first defining who you want to be. “You need to ask questions like: ‘Who are we? And what do we value?’” And she says it’s not a question just for headquarters, but one that needs to be posed globally throughout the organisation.

Each year, Mondelēz conducts an employee engagement survey, like a lot of organisations. The aim is to better understand employees and, hopefully, identify areas for improvement. But surveys are a huge investment and trying to make sense of the data that comes back can be a huge undertaking.

“We build teams who are passionate about Mondelēz and our values to discuss how to address the survey results,” says Strobl. “Our aim is to uncover the insights, not just the responses, but what’s buried beneath them. And then we frame those responses around Capability, Culture, and Capacity.”

Mondelēz takes employee engagement much further than the survey. They conduct online hackathons—something that a lot of tech companies have been known to do to develop unique solutions to real business problems—and create various global teams with the aim to help employees develop things like resilience and overcome the complexity of working in a matrix organisation.

“We ask for the whole employee,” says Strobl. A lot of organisations are working to create the culture where their whole self. The days of separating work from life are dwindling and corporations realise that combatting attrition requires a multifaceted approach—one that not only includes regular feedback and pulse checks, but an approach that also allows employees across all levels to feel valued, empowered, and able to bring their whole selves to work.But how do you create a company culture that drives the behaviours you want? The kind of behaviours that lead to success?

Betsey Strobl, Talent and Organization Effectiveness Leader for Asia Pacific, Middle East and Africa at Mondelēz says it’s about first defining who you want to be. “You need to ask questions like: ‘Who are we? And what do we value?’” And she says it’s not a question just for headquarters, but one that needs to be posed globally throughout the organisation.

Each year, Mondelēz conducts an employee engagement survey, like a lot of organisations. The aim is to better understand employees and, hopefully, identify areas for improvement. But surveys are a huge investment and trying to make sense of the data that comes back can be a huge undertaking.

“We build teams who are passionate about Mondelēz and our values to discuss how to address the survey results,” says Strobl. “Our aim is to uncover the insights, not just the responses, but what’s buried beneath them. And then we frame those responses around Capability, Culture, and Capacity.”

Mondelēz takes employee engagement much further than the survey. They conduct online hackathons—something that a lot of tech companies have been known to do to develop unique solutions to real business problems—and create various global teams with the aim to help employees develop things like resilience and overcome the complexity of working in a matrix organisation.

“We ask for the whole employee,” says Strobl. A lot of organisations are working to create the culture where their whole self. The days of separating work from life are dwindling and corporations realise that combatting attrition requires a multifaceted approach—one that not only includes regular feedback and pulse checks, but an approach that also allows employees across all levels to feel valued, empowered, and able to bring their whole selves to work.